Advocacy Links

National, State & Local Resources
Get ideas & answers
There is a lot of helpful information on arts advocacy to be found online.  The list below provides some of the most useful basic and detailed explanations of the advocate's role, how to advocate effectively (and legally), and presenting a clear and effective message. "Art Means Business" written in chalk on pavement
  • Americans for the Arts advances and leads the network of organizations and individuals who cultivate, promote, sustain, and support the arts in America. "Connecting your best ideas and leaders from the arts, communities, and business, together we can work to ensure that every American has access to the transformative power of the arts."
  • Theatre Communications Group is a major advocate for the not-for-profit professional theatre in the United States. TCG represents the theatre field both in Washington, DC, and nationally, to provide timely information for theatres and theatre artists on federal legislation, regulations and other significant government opportunities and issues.
  • The National Assembly of State Arts Agencies links & supports state arts agencies that serve to increase public access to the arts and work to ensure that every community in America enjoys the cultural, civic, economic and educational benefits of a thriving arts sector.
  • The State Arts Action Network (SAAN) currently includes 53 members from 42 states, including the District of Columbia. Members independently lead their state’s arts policy initiatives and gather together to share best practices.
  • The pARTnership Movement provides businesses and arts organizations with tools to make meaningful collaborations - partnerships that not only support a healthy, creative, and artistic community, but also give businesses a competitive advantage.
  • The Arts. Ask for More is a national arts education public awareness campaign brought to you by Americans for the Arts, The Ad Council, the NAMM Foundation, and hundreds of local, state, and national official campaign partners.
  • Arts Advocacy Toolkit on the Arts for LA website. A series of modules is intended to correspond to incresing levels of involvenent.  The first few are helpful to those engaging in direct, one-time advocacy actions, such as providing public testimony.  The next few, beginning with "How to start an advocacy team," are meant to guide those who want to engage in long-term advocacy efforts.  The last few, beginning with "Recruitment and leadership development," are for those who desire to take on leadership in a long-term advocacy effort.
  • Advocacy Resources for Challenging Times by the National Arts Education Association.  Includes tips on being an advocate and "Advocacy Basics."
      Communicate a clear MESSAGE.
        •    Be VISIBLE to decision makers.
        •    Harness the influence of an advocacy NETWORK. - See more at: http://www.arteducators.org/advocacy#sthash.apiWx8F4.dpuf
    •    Communicate a clear MESSAGE.
        •    Be VISIBLE to decision makers.
        •    Harness the influence of an advocacy NETWORK. - See more at: http://www.arteducators.org/advocacy#sthash.apiWx8F4.dpuf
    •    Communicate a clear MESSAGE.
        •    Be VISIBLE to decision makers.
        •    Harness the influence of an advocacy NETWORK. - See more at: http://www.arteducators.org/advocacy#sthash.apiWx8F4.dpuf
    •    Communicate a clear MESSAGE.
        •    Be VISIBLE to decision makers.
        •    Harness the influence of an advocacy NETWORK. - See more at: http://www.arteducators.org/advocacy#sthash.apiWx8F4.dpuf

 

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